Shaughnessy: Guerrero Is Shady

Dan Shaughnessy has no problem with Bill Belichick trying to keep trainer Alex Guerrero away

Reiter Than You
June 11, 2018 - 5:30 pm

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New England Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman was suspended four games last week for violating the NFL’s performance enhancing drug policy.

That, however, was not the biggest Patriots takeaway for Boston Globe columnist Dan Shaughnessy.
 
“It’s really not that big of a deal in football circles,” Shaughnessy said on Reiter Than You, referring to Edelman's suspension. “The larger issue is the Tom Brady-Alex Guerrero connection.”
 
Guerrero, Brady’s personal trainer, had been helping Edelman recovery from a torn ACL injury that he sustained last August.
 
“The Guerrero history is really shady,” Shaughnessy said. “I mean, you can look it up – it’s like claiming to be a doctor when you’re not, lying about your degrees, and being shut down by the feds twice for selling concussion juice and cancer cures. It’s just appalling.”
 
Guerrero’s dubious past has made him a controversial figure. Still, Brady has become fond of Guerrero’s alternative training style, even citing it as a major reason for his on-the-field success in recent years.

“It’s been great for Brady because he’s playing better than ever at 40 years old,” Shaughnessy said. “He’s a devote disciple of this alternative, holistic anti-Western medicine stuff. He’s all in on this.”
 
While Bill Belichick appears okay with Brady training with Guerrero, he does not want Guerrero training with the rest of the Patriots. This is why Guerrero has been banned from New England’s practice facilities and from traveling with the team, which led to Brady’s rumored resentment with his head coach of 18 years.
 
“I do think that the Guerrero thing is the root of (Brady) not being happy with things,” Shaughnessy said. “I have no issue with Belichick trying to keep the guy away.”
 
Shaughnessy believes there is some truth to the reported tension among Brady, Belichick, and owner Robert Kraft, noting that all good things eventually come to an end. 

“I believe those reports to be true,” Shaughnessy said. “They’ll get where they want to go with the situation. It might not end that well, but it’s been 18 years. That’s been a good long run. It has to an end at some point.”
 
Time will tell whether it ends next season.